Resources

Links and external resources

Follow up to ‘Finding Your Genealogy Source Code’

On Wednesday, June 16, we held “How I fIT: Finding your genealogy source code,” hosted by Alonzo Felder, an IT analyst for the Duke Global Health Institute. Please see Alonzo’s guidance and list of resources to dog deeper: Genealogy II notes. Alonzo explained how exploring family trees can deepen your sense of identity and belonging. …

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Follow up: Genealogy Brown Bag Lunch

Friday’s Brown Bag Lunch on genealogy, hosted by Terence Bailey, was a humble introduction, chock-full of both invaluable resources on how to get started and shared stories of experiences too. Panelists from Duke University Libraries — Jacquie Samples, Lesley Looper and Will Sexton — all joined the discussion and provided us with an abundance of …

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Spoken Word Performance Highlights Need for Racial Justice

Working @ Duke has a wonderful article about Trina Rodriguez spoken word poem, “Who Could Understand the Plight of a Black Man?” “Rodriguez opened her laptop and wrote her first spoken word poem, “Who Could Understand the Plight of a Black Man?” Then last July, she performed the poem during a virtual “Living (IT) While …

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Who Could Understand the Plight of a Black Man? 

Hopefully, you were able to participate in the in the video screening and interactive workshop for Who Could Understand the Plight of a Black Man? on Tuesday, December 8th.   The videos are available  here: Purple: https://youtu.be/S-OnDFv5tVU and Red: https://warpwire.duke.edu/w/k3AEAA/  **Videos contain graphic historical depictions, watch with care.** To our Black men colleagues, we support you. We …

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Webcast ‘Left of Black’ celebrates 300 episodes over 10 years of production!

Mark Anthony Neal and a group of Duke staff created “Left of Black” in 2010 to highlight boundary-pushing work by scholars in Black studies, history and art. A decade later, the webcast has completed nearly 300 episodes with about 400,000 views and recently launched its 11th season.   Read more and find links to the series …

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In case you missed it – My Work is My Protest video

If you weren’t able to attend the November 5th presentation by Dr Nick Washington “My Work is My Protest” , here’s a video playback of the event. My Work is My Protest – Conversations with Dr Nicki Washington Numerous events of 2020 have placed a national spotlight on the inequities and inequalities that are present …

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FOLLOW UP: How Duke Libraries Learned from the Black Student Experience

Hello all,   Thanks to everyone who attended last week’s event, How Duke Libraries Learned from the Black Student Experience, presented by Emily Daly. For those of you who were not able to attend, you can view the presentation slides: bit.ly/Diversify-IT. And attached is the Racial Justice Roadmap, referenced in the discussion.   As you’ll …

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Duke’s ‘Living While Black’ Session Videos Now Available

https://today.duke.edu/2020/07/living-while-black-session-videos-now-available “To allow members of the Duke community to access the June 16 Living While Black event, Duke has posted the videos of the four sessions online, available to any member of the Duke community with a Duke NetID. (Read about in this Duke Today article.)”

Living While Black

https://today.duke.edu/2020/06/living-while-black-raw-discussions-race-duke-and-america “Against a backdrop of dual crises of public health and racial justice, more than 50 Black faculty, staff and students shared personal stories of racism and discrimination, presented research on racial inequities, and issued urgent calls for change.”